2013 Hispanic Consumer Survey

Methodology

McLaughlin & Associates partnered with Penn Schoen Berland to develop and conduct a bipartisan national online survey of 400 adult Hispanic wireless phone users, who are likely voters. The survey was conducted between April 16-26, 2013. All interviews were conducted online and respondents were given a choice to take the survey in English or Spanish. Interview selection was at random within predetermined geographic units. These units were structured to statistically correlate with actual census of the Hispanic population. The accuracy of the sample of 400 adult Hispanic wireless phone users, who are likely voters, is within +/- 4.9% at a 95% confidence interval. The survey results in this summary have been rounded and the wording for each question is verbatim from the questionnaire.

Summary

Hispanics continue to be highly satisfied wireless phone customers and consider the wireless service they get to be a good value. Most Hispanics view their wireless service as an essential service in their everyday life. A slight majority says it is more important to have a wireless phone than broadband Internet, cable/satellite television or a home landline phone. Like other wireless phone consumers, Hispanics are very price sensitive. They oppose adding new wireless taxes and fees and are likely to believe that adding new regulations would make their wireless service more expensive. Nearly all Hispanics believe the wireless tax rate should be the same or less than the taxes they pay on general goods and services, which is approximately 7%.

Survey Structure

The survey is divided into 5 sections. Jump to a section or explore the whole survey.

Additional Consumer Surveys


Consumer Satisfaction

Overall, are you satisfied or dissatisfied with your cell phone service?

Hispanics remain overwhelmingly satisfied with their wireless phone service. Nine in ten (94%) are satisfied customers and the majority (53%) is “very” satisfied. This high level of satisfaction is both wide and deep across all demographics. Only 6% claims to be dissatisfied with their service.

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Satisfied 92 94 96 97 86 96 93 96 91 94 96 93
Dissatisfied 7 6 4 3 14 4 7 4 9 6 4 7

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Considering the price you pay for your cell phone service and the benefits it provides you, do you consider the value of your cell phone service to be excellent, good, fair or poor?

Considering the price they pay for their wireless phone service and the benefits it provides them, virtually 4 in 5 (79%) Hispanics consider their wireless phone service to be either an “excellent” (28%) or “good” (51%) value. One in five (21%) considers their value to be either “fair” (16%) or “poor” (5%). The net positive value rating improved 12-points between May 2012 (+46) and this year’s survey (+58).

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Excellent/Good 73 79 82 77 75 84 81 80 74 66 83 75
Fair/Poor 27 21 18 23 26 16 19 20 26 34 17 25

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Consumer Lifestyle

If you had to choose one, which one of the following is the most important for you to have?

A slight majority (51%) says having a wireless phone is more important to them than having broadband Internet (27%), cable/satellite television (13%), or a home landline phone (10%). The importance of having a wireless phone increases among Hispanics 40 years old or younger, Hispanics in rural areas and women. Broadband Internet is just as important as wireless phones among 41-55 year olds.

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Cell/Smart Phone 44 51 49 50 55 63 58 36 53 27 46 56
Broadband Internet 34 27 30 24 22 26 26 35 22 19 31 22
Cable/Satellite TV 11 13 12 15 16 10 10 18 9 31 13 13
Home Landline Phone 9 10 10 11 7 2 6 12 16 23 10 19
Don’t Know 3

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Would you consider giving up your home landline phone and only use a cell phone?

More than two-thirds of Hispanics already have (30%) or would consider (39%) giving up their home landline phone and only use a wireless phone. A little less than one-third (30%) wouldn’t consider “cutting the cord.” Even the majority of senior citizens has or would consider “cutting the cord.”

13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Yes 39 41 36 42 51 33 38 36 35 48 30
No 30 29 35 26 15 29 36 40 45 27 34
Already Have 30 30 30 32 34 38 26 24 21 26 35

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When making phone calls at home, do you…?

Seven in ten (70%) Hispanics use their wireless phone more than a home landline phone. One in five (19%) is more likely to use a home landline phone and 11% use both phones equally. Just over half (51%) “always” uses their wireless phone at home. More than three-quarters of consumers 40 years old and younger are regular wireless phone users at home. The use of a home landline phone increases among Hispanics older than 55 years old.

13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Wireless 70 76 67 59 89 79 62 53 49 73 67
Always 51 56 45 49 64 58 44 44 27 50 52
More 19 21 22 10 25 21 17 10 23 24 15
Equally 11 7 13 17 5 10 16 16 6 11 11
More 14 14 12 15 6 10 20 18 20 11 16
Always 6 3 9 9 0 2 2 13 24 5 6
Landline 19 16 20 24 6 12 22 31 45 16 22

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Outside of your workplace or office, which one of the following devices do you use most often to send and read e-mails?

Lap top (34%) and desk top (33%) computers are the top devices used most often to send and read e-mails. The use of wireless phones doesn’t trail far behind at 27%. Only 6% use a tablet more often to send and read e-mails. The use of a wireless phone is the top choice among Hispanics who are under 41 years old or in urban areas.

13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Lap Top Computer 34 31 33 42 36 29 36 41 23 29 38
Desk Top Computer 33 32 36 30 12 27 36 48 69 37 29
Wireless/Smart Phone 27 33 21 22 43 34 24 10 6 29 25
Tablet 6 4 10 6 9 10 5 2 3 5 8

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Outside of your workplace or office, which one of the following devices do you use most often to go online?

The plurality (39%) of Hispanics uses a lap top computer most often to go online followed by a desk top computer (33%), a wireless phone (23%) and a tablet (6%). The use of a wireless phone increases among those who live in urban areas or are under 41 years old.

13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Lap Top Computer 39 38 37 44 43 35 42 41 28 35 43
Desk Top Computer 33 31 36 32 11 28 41 45 66 37 29
Wireless/Smart Phone 23 29 17 18 41 30 10 12 3 24 22
Tablet 6 2 10 6 6 8 8 2 3 4 7

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Do you consider your wireless service as an essential service in your everyday life?

Nearly 9 in 10 (88%) Hispanics consider their wireless service as an essential service in their everyday life. This overwhelming sentiment is evident across all consumer demographics.

13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Yes 88 87 92 87 98 92 81 85 77 87 90
No 12 13 8 13 2 8 19 15 23 13 10

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Other than making or receiving voice calls, which one of the following cell phone features is most important to you?

Other than making or receiving voice calls, texting (75%) is clearly the most popular wireless phone feature among Hispanics. The other top features are taking pictures (58%), Internet access (57%), and e-mail (54%). Hispanics 18-29 years old frequently use a wide variety of features on their wireless phones.

13-May 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Texting 75 88 79 74 63 59 72 78
Taking Pictures 58 68 56 58 49 54 52 64
Internet Access 57 69 71 49 43 31 56 58
E-Mail 54 64 65 50 42 26 51 56
GPS 42 49 47 38 33 39 44 41
Music 38 69 41 27 15 11 37 38
Apps 34 47 40 31 23 9 34 34
Games 32 48 33 24 21 24 30 34
Video 25 42 26 24 8 9 31 19
Job Search 10 19 10 7 7 3 10 10
FM Radio Chip 7 11 9 4 0 6 8 6
Civic Engagement 3 4 5 2 0 0 3 2
Other 6 0 2 8 9 23 6 6

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What type of “apps” do you use most often on your cell phone or other wireless devices?

Weather (50%), social networking (48%), GPS (47%) and entertainment (45%) are the most popular apps Hispanics use on their wireless devices. The second tier of most used apps includes banking/finance (38%), news/politics (29%), restaurant/dining (23%), and sports (23%). The use of the various apps, except apps related to civic engagement, increases among Hispanics 40 years old and younger. Sports apps are predominately used by men rather than women.

13-May 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Weather 50 59 59 48 37 28 47 52
Social Networking 48 66 52 43 39 24 45 52
GPS 47 57 62 43 26 34 47 47
Entertainment 45 66 55 41 22 15 46 44
Banking/Finance 38 45 46 35 33 15 39 37
News/Politics 29 33 37 34 16 6 31 26
Restaurant/Dining 23 30 29 22 11 14 24 22
Sports 23 34 25 19 18 3 35 10
Education 15 27 18 10 7 3 16 15
Health/Fitness 15 24 20 12 7 2 16 14
Job Search 13 21 15 9 9 6 13 13
Civic Engagement 5 6 6 4 2 3 7 3
Other 17 5 8 22 20 58 16 18

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Do you or does someone in your household use a wireless device, like a wireless phone or tablet, for education or school related purposes?

Overall, roughly half (49%) of Hispanic households use a wireless device for education or school related purposes. More than two-thirds (69%) in households with a child or adult in school or college uses a wireless device for education related reasons.

13-May 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women In School No School
Yes 49 61 64 40 37 12 50 47 69 30
No 47 32 31 56 62 85 45 50 28 66
Don’t Know 4 6 4 4 1 3 5 3 4 5

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Have you ever used your cell phone for civic engagement or advocacy like signing an online petition, sending an e-mail to a legislator or making a donation to a certain cause?

A little over one-quarter (28%) of Hispanics has used their wireless phone for civic engagement or advocacy. Younger Hispanics and Hispanics in urban areas are more likely to use their wireless phone for civic engagement or advocacy.

13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Yes 28 33 24 20 42 31 18 23 9 30 25
No 69 64 72 77 52 64 79 76 91 66 71
Don’t Know 4 4 4 3 6 5 3 1 0 4 4

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From the following list, which privacy issues for wireless consumers are most important to you?

Protecting personal data, communications and transactions is the top priority privacy issue among Hispanic wireless consumers. The second most important privacy issue is allowing or blocking advertisements or marketing phone calls, and spam text messages. Protecting children’s privacy and allowing or blocking location based services that use your phone to determine your location are the bottom two issues. Among senior citizens, allowing or blocking advertisements or marketing phone calls, and spam text messages is almost as important as protecting personal data, communications and transactions.

13-May 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Protect Personal Data 69 73 69 71 67 60 64 75
Allow/Block Marketing 40 29 34 37 52 64 43 36
Protect Children’s Privacy 29 25 38 25 29 17 26 31
Allow/Block Location 26 32 28 28 20 18 27 26
Other 1 0 0 0 0 6 1 1

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Government Regulations

Do you believe adding new government regulations on cell phone service would make your cell phone service more expensive or less expensive?

Like other wireless consumers, Hispanics are sensitive to anything that would increase the price of their service. By virtually a 3 to 1 ratio (51% to 17%), half believes adding new government regulations on wireless phone service would make their service more expensive.

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women Under $60K Over $60K
More Exp. 51 51 47 50 64 45 52 43 66 55 51 51 47 59
Less Exp. 13 17 20 14 12 23 19 18 9 6 18 15 17 15
No Diff 18 18 20 18 11 18 18 19 13 26 17 19 21 13
Don’t Know 19 14 12 18 13 15 11 20 11 15 13 15 15 13

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Digital Downloads

How often would you say you purchase online digital downloads such as ringtones, music, videos, games, books, software or apps to your cell phone or other wireless device?

More than two-thirds (69%) of Hispanics purchase online digital downloads to their wireless phone or other wireless device. Hispanics under 41 years old are more likely to purchase digital downloads.

12-May 13-May 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women Under $60K Over $60K
Download 62 69 81 84 70 47 33 71 66 66 73
Everyday 6 9 15 11 8 4 0 11 7 9 10
Once/Twice a Week 11 12 23 15 8 4 0 16 8 12 12
Once/Twice a Month 19 22 22 35 20 10 9 21 23 22 21
Rarely 27 26 21 23 33 28 24 24 28 24 30
Never 37 31 19 16 30 53 68 29 34 34 27

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Which statement do you agree with more on the issue of taxing the purchases of online digital downloads?

  1. Federal guidelines should establish one fair and consistent set of taxes to apply to purchases of online digital downloads.
  2. Each state should have the right to decide how its state taxes the purchases of online digital downloads, even if it means the consumer could be subject to taxes from multiple jurisdictions for the same purchase.

The plurality of Hispanics (44%) prefer digital downloads being subject to one fair and consistent set of taxes established by federal guideline. Nearly one-third (32%) thinks each state should have the right to decide how its state taxes the purchases of online digital downloads, even if it means the consumer could be subject to taxes from multiple jurisdictions for the same purchase.  With one-quarter (24%) not having an opinion on the issue, it remains apparent that consumers need to be educated in order to make an informed decision.

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women
Federal 50 44 41 50 38 36 48 45 41 54 38 49
State 27 32 35 26 34 39 34 30 31 17 36 28
Don’t Know 23 24 24 24 28 25 19 25 29 30 26 23

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Taxes & Fees

From what you know, about what percentage of your monthly cell phone bill is taxes and fees?

There continues to be a lack of awareness among Hispanics about how much they actually pay in taxes and fees on their monthly wireless phone bills. One-quarter (25%) doesn’t know what they pay in taxes and fees. Among those who gave an estimate, most Hispanics think they pay less than 15%. The average answer is 10.7%, which is significantly lower than the national average of 17.1%.

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women Under $60K Over $60K
Less/5% 13 11 12 10 12 12 11 11 12 6 10 12 13 8
5% to 9% 28 31 32 29 30 36 36 29 22 21 36 25 30 32
10% to 14% 18 16 15 19 13 12 20 12 21 15 15 17 13 22
15% to 19% 9 10 12 9 8 13 9 6 14 9 11 9 9 12
20%/More 7 8 8 9 6 7 4 9 10 11 8 8 8 7
Don’t Know 26 25 22 25 31 21 19 34 20 38 20 29 27 21
MEAN % 10.5% 10.7% 10.7% 11.0% 10.1% 10.4% 9.9% 10.6% 11.8% 12.5% 10.6% 10.9% 10.5% 11.1%

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Do you think the tax rate on your monthly cell phone service should be lower, the same or higher than the average sales tax rate of about 7% paid on general goods and services?

Approximately two-thirds (65%) of Hispanics think the tax rate on their monthly wireless phone bill should be lower than the taxes they pay on general goods and services, which is approximately 7%. Combined, 96% believes the tax rate should be the same or less than the taxes they pay on general goods and services, which is relatively consistent across demographics.

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women Under $60K Over $60K
Lower 61 65 63 69 64 57 70 65 71 64 61 70 64 67
The Same 27 31 31 30 32 40 24 30 27 33 34 28 33 27
Higher 3 4 7 1 3 3 6 6 2 3 6 3 4 6
Don’t Know 10

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Would you support or oppose Congress passing a 5-year freeze or moratorium on all new wireless taxes and fees, which would prohibit states and municipalities from raising taxes and fees on wireless services?

Hispanics continue to overwhelming support Congress passing a 5-year moratorium on all new wireless taxes and fees. More than three-quarters (78%) support the proposal and the majority (56%) “strongly” supports it. Only 9% opposes the proposal.

12-May 13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women Under $60K Over $60K
Support 85 78 77 83 73 69 85 77 84 76 83 74 77 81
Oppose 7 9 11 5 11 16 6 9 7 6 8 10 10 7
Don’t Know 8 13 12 12 17 16 9 14 9 18 9 16 13 12

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Under current law, there is a moratorium that prohibits states and municipalities from taxing your access to the internet— the monthly charge from your internet service provider. This law is set to expire in November 2014. If it expires, state and local governments would be allowed to impose taxes on your monthly internet bill. Would you support or oppose Congress continuing the moratorium, which prohibits states and municipalities from taxing your access to the Internet?

By nearly a 3 to 1 ratio (67% to 23%), two-thirds of Hispanics support Congress continuing the moratorium which prohibits states and municipalities from taxing access to the Internet. A slight majority (51%) “strongly” supports it.

13-May Urban Suburb Rural 18-29 30-40 41-55 56-65 Over 65 Men Women Under $60K Over $60K
Support 67 66 73 59 62 77 63 66 69 72 62 65 72
Oppose 23 24 18 31 27 16 22 30 23 19 28 25 21
Don’t Know 9 10 9 10 11 7 16 3 8 9 10 10 8

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